Very good summary of the effect of RF radiation – with links

Very good summary of the effect of RF radiation – with links

EMR Protection Services

Why are infants more susceptible to the influence of RF radiation?
In the first 2 years of life the majority of hardwiring in the brain occurs, in scientific terms the number of connections (synapses) between neurons (brain cells) peak.
During this fragile period the brain tissue is more electrically conductive due to a higher ion concentration and water content. (2)
Infants skulls are also thinner resulting in the wireless energy being able to penetrate deeper into the brain tissue.
Infants skulls are not yet fused, there are large membranous areas between the bones…very thin, like skin.
An important event in neurological (brain) development that occurs post-natally (after birth) is a process called Myelination.
Myelination facilitates the transmission of information within the Central Nervous System (CNS) and occurs most rapidly in the first 2 years of life.
Myelin integrity is vital to healthy nervous system development and functioning. Many studies indicate that wireless RF radiation negatively affected myelin.
“Many myelin sheaths were damaged, with scarring and loose loops of myelin sheathes evident. (2) Later research also indicated damage to myelin.” (3)
“Overall, evidence from in vivo, in vitro and epidemiological studies suggests an association between RF-EMF exposure and either myelin deterioration or a direct impact on neuronal conduction.” (4)
Damage to myelin sheathe is the equivalent of brain damage.
“Consequences of RF exposure during the myelination process is poorly understood due to lack of research. Though because developmental processes are vulnerable to disruption it is reasonable to expect that this important stage of brain development may present its own unique risks. Disrupted myelination might be a potential cause of neuro-behavioural disorders.” (2)
“Mice exposed to the wireless radiation regimen displayed neurological impairment evident as demyelination of cortical neurons.” The scientists concluded the damage to myelin was an influential factor in the hyperactive behaviour observed in the mice.(2)
In ADHD widespread differences in myelin integrity between adults with persistent ADHD and healthy individuals suggesting that abnormal myelination is a common factor in ADHD. (16)
In 2001, a study was done at Yale University by Dr. Hugh Taylor where pregnant mice were exposed to cell phone radiation. The offspring of the exposure group exhibited more hyperactivity and poorer memory.
These scientists and medical doctors concluded that what they saw in the exposure group, if extrapolated to humans, it would have looked similar to what we consider ADHD. Importantly noted was that the mice who had the highest level of exposure gave birth to offspring that exhibited the most pronounced abnormalities. (14)
A different group of scientists came to the same conclusion. “RF-EMF exposure led to hyperactivity behaviour as apparent by significant increases in moving distance and duration in the open field test. (2)
“Epidemiologic studies have linked wireless radiation exposure from mobile phones with neurological and cognitive dysfunctions.” (11,12,13)
In fact after an association was made in study(12) a repeat study was performed after taking in confounders (variables that can render experiment invalid). The result of the study was repeated.
Exposure to RF radiation and to a lesser degree post-natally was associated with behavioural problems in school (13).
We have cause and effect in mice studies and epidemiological evidence in humans.
RF radiation also reduced the amount of brain cells in animal models.
Rats exposed to wireless radiation showed that postnatal EMF exposure caused a significant decrease in the number of pyramidal brain cells.(5)
Pyramidal neurons (pyramidal cells) are a type of multipolar brain cell found in the cerebral cortex, the hippocampus, and the amygdala.(5)
A similar study showed that rats exposed to RF had a significantly decreased number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.(6) Purkinje cells, also called Purkinje neurons, are brain cells in vertebrate animals located in the cerebellar cortex of the brain.
In a review of all autism literature a significantly reduced number of purkinje brain cells in the cerebellum was a commonality. (17, 18)
Several studies of maternal occupational RF exposure, have reported an increased risk of birth defects and recent studies indicate heavy cell phone has been scientifically associated with 3x the rate of miscarriage. (15)
A number of studies have reported that RF-EMF exposure of animal models increases blood-brain barrier permeability, impairs intracellular calcium homeostasis, alters neurotransmitters, and increases neuronal loss and damage in brain tissue.
In addition it is strongly suggested that “autophagy” (cellular recycling process) is activated in in the brain cells by wireless exposure as a means of cell survival from the stress. Stress that if wasn’t mitigated scientists conclude would effectively lead to degenerative brain diseases. What this means is that the brain induces this cellular process to protect itself against the insult of wireless radiation. (2)
Autophagy alterations have been observed in a variety of neurological disorders (10)
This is a enormous reason why fasting and a low carb (ketogenic) diet can successfully treat Alzheimer’s. Both fasting and carb restriction can induce autophagy in the neurons (brain cells). (1, 10)
ADHD, autism, Alzheimer’s and Multiple sclerosis are all conditions that are scientifically associated with abnormalities in myelin. ALL of these neurological conditions are on the rise.
Conclusion:
When industry tells us that this radiation has no impact on our bodies or childrens development we must be skeptical that based on the scientific data available.
Why would we take the chance? Why wouldn’t we protect our bodies and children?
(1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534972
(2) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5247706/
(3) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3735912/
(4) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205214
(5) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19230827
(6) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20691167
(7) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3735912/
(8) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4416385/
(9) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15793579
(10) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29056525
(11) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2092490/
(12) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18467962
(13) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21138897
(14) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306017/
(15) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4416385/
16 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25956761
(17) http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download
(18) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820437/#B27
(44) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2893813/


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